Counselling, Psychotherapy and Clinical Psychology199

More about Mindfulness Therapy

Mindfulness is an ancient Buddhist practice which is relevant for life today. Mindfulness is a very simple concept. It means paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgementally. This increases awareness, clarity and acceptance of our present-moment reality.

In recent years, psychotherapists and psychologists have turned to mindfulness based psychological therapies as important elements in the treatment of a number of problems, including:

  • Depression
  • Substance abuse
  • Eating disorders
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder

Some experts believe that mindfulness works, in part, by helping people to accept their experiences — including painful emotions — rather than react to them with aversion and avoidance.

It has become increasingly common for mindfulness techniques to be combined with psychotherapy, especially cognitive behavioral therapy. This development makes good sense, since both mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy share the common goal of helping people gain perspective on irrational, maladaptive, and self-defeating thoughts.

Several of our therapists incorporate mindfulness into their clients treatment. One of our therapists, Tiffany Muharrem, runs a weekly mindfulness group.